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Championship Productions Featured Items!

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    with Dave Odom,
    former Head Coach at the University of South Carolina and Wake Forest;
    406 Career wins, 9x NCAA Tournament Appearances, 3x ACC Coach of the Year

    Develop an aggressive offensive attack for countering defensive pressure. Dave Odom presents drills and strategies for successfully attacking full court pressure. In addition, you will see a segment how to attack a match-up zone using counter action and baseline screens and cutters to put the defense on their heels.

    Attacking Full-Court Pressure (40 mins)
    Coach Odom demonstrates build up drills for handling full-court pressure situations with an emphasis on seeing the whole court and getting the ball up the court safely. Odom showcases two press breaks that can be used as an aggressive offensive attack depending on the type of pressure you face. These press breaks allow you to have at least three good passing options open at all times and emphasize moving the ball with the pass rather than the dribble.

    Countering the Match-Up Zone (15 mins)
    Coach Odom walks you through his match-up zone offense. In this offense, you will see how the use of misdirection and false action can confuse the defense. With baseline screens and the use of cutters, the defense is forced to make a choice between leaving a shooter open or leaving the low post open. Odom shows you how the offense then flows into an overload where it can over power the defense in the post.

    This video provides terrific strategies for alleviating defensive pressure. Order this video today and enjoy the success it will bring to your program!

    54 minutes. 2015.


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    with Ryan Looney, Seattle Pacific University Head Coach;
    2013 Great Northwest Athletic Conference Tournament Champions;
    Ended the 2013 season ranked Number 2 in the country

    Coach Ryan Looney opens the doors to a Seattle Pacific University practice to show how he has established a culture of tenacious rebounding effort and solid defense. The instruction he shares in this video package demonstrates how to develop the right habits for a highly competitive practice.

    Disc 1:
    Everything you need to know about implementing and running the swing offense is included in this disc of early season practices. Watch as Coach Looney leads his team through a well-rounded practice with segments on how to teach his swing offense along with drills for shooting and skill development, and breakdown drills for team defense.

    The Seattle Pacific coaching staff spends a good portion of this first practice session running the swing offense 5v5 and breaking down the offense into its parts for position breakdown drills. Coach Looney emphasizes the transition offense with drills such as the 21 "continuous and fast break offense." These drills help condition players to score on the fast break or to transition into the offense.

    During the defensive portions of the practice, Coach Looney works his team on defending the swing offense in a 5vs5 shell drill. Emphases include defensive closeouts to the ball and defending the side pick and roll.

    Finally, Coach Looney and the Seattle Pacific coaching staff break down the team into guards and post players for skill development and shooting drills.

    Disc 2:
    In this practice session, Coach Looney shows the hard work and focus that he demands of his players to create a winning program. He builds on the previous practice with an emphasis on transitioning into the swing offense and building up the team defense with break down drills.

    Again, the team takes part in breakdown drills for both the swing offense and individual skill development. During the skill development phase, post players work on back-to-the-basket moves and finishing through contact. Guards get shots up with three-man/two-ball shooting.

    The Seattle Pacific coaches spend significant time working on defending side ball screens in a 4-on-4 shell drill, with a high hedge by the post player. Coach Looney also shares techniques on defending various other offensive situations, including baseline "stagger" screens and "pin-down" screens.

    Coach Looney concludes his practice with a competitive 5-on-5 scrimmage that gives his team the opportunity to bring the day's breakdown drills into a game-like scenario.

    This DVD gives coaches at every level a blueprint for a competitive practice that establishes a culture of toughness, rebounding, and defense.

    265 minutes (2 DVDs). 2015.

    All Access videos are designed to allow viewers from all over the world to see how successful coaches run their practices in a "live" practice setting. All Access videos allow viewers to see the practices un-edited and in real-time. You will see how top coaches run their drills, interact with their team and staff, how they motivate their team, the cue words they use, the atmosphere of the practice and how practices are structured from day to day. Many coaches visit successful colleges and high schools to watch practice. But if you live out of state or out of the country, visiting another coach's gym can be costly. That's why we created the All Access Practice Series of videos -- to bring the practices to you!


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    with Don Showalter, Iowa City (IA) High School Head Coach;
    USA Development Coach - Coach of the USA Men's U16 and U17 National Teams (2009-14); back-to-back co-recipient of the USA Basketball Developmental Coach of the Year award (2013-14). This was the sixth-straight year he was named the USA Basketball Developmental Coach of the Year!;
    2012 United States Olympic Committee's (USOC) Volunteer Coach of the Year award; led Team USA to the gold medal at the 2013 FIBA Americas U16 Championships; 6x gold medalist for USA Basketball (2009-2014), undefeated in medal play (2009-2014), 500+ career wins

    Don Showalter, a five-time recipient of USA Basketball's Developmental Coach of the Year award, provides a solid but simple continuity offense that has multiple advantages over several different types of zone defense.

    Developing Team Culture Coach Showalter beings his presentation with a detailed explanation of the 4 Cs-culture, comfort, compete and communication-that must be practiced daily in order to develop a healthy culture and a solid basketball program. He also shares 15 player standards to help develop passion and enthusiasm for his program. Players demonstrate Coach Showalters' "communication circle" activity designed to help them get out of their comfort zone and communicate.

    Continuity Zone OffenseMoving to the court, Coach Showalter demonstrates his simple continuity zone offense, which facilitates ball reversal. He explains how players flash into gaps, creating indecision with the defense. This all- purpose zone offense can be executed against 1-2-2, 1-3-1, and 2-3 zone defenses. Coach Showalter also shares several rules to go along with his offense. He shows how to use the dribble and how to screen a zone defense to create indecision.

    Coach Showalter demonstrates a 4-high zone offense that involves screening action against the zone. He demonstrates another zone set that's great to run out of a time-out. This play involves placing two post players on the same side of the floor with a back-pick and lob pass to get easy offense.

    Ultimately a successful offense is determined by how you run it. Coach Showalter shares eight excellent zone points, and shows how to disguise your regular zone offense by simply placing players in a double stack to begin the offense.

    Top 10 Mistakes High School Coaches MakeThe presentation closes with Coach Showalter's list of top 10 mistakes made by high school coaches. This list provides tremendous insight on avoiding the mistakes that the average coach makes.

    Coach Showalter shares great sets that will allow you to get your best players a shot if you need to score quickly. His concepts on zone offense are beneficial whether you're attacking a 2-3, 3-2, or 1-3-1 zone defense.

    Produced at the Fall 2013 St. Louis (MO) clinic.

    67 minutes. 2015.


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    with Greg McDermott, Creighton University Head Coach;
    2013 MVC Regular Season and Tournament Champions,
    3x MVC Tournament Champions; led team to a school record 29 wins in 2012.

    Greg McDermott lets you peek behind the curtain and witness a typical Creighton practice in this 80-minute, on-court demonstration. You'll see how Coach McDermott addresses every major aspect of the game in balanced fashion as he prepares his team for the season ahead.

    Focusing on the defensive end of the court, this practice includes a series of drills that build from basic concepts to larger team strategies. He also has his players demonstrate individual skill drills that are essential to their overall development. Along the way Coach McDermott interacts with the coaches in the audience and gives them his thoughts on some of the drills.

    Two great drills launch the defensive segment of this presentation:

    • Slide, Run and Pivot Drill: In this drill, players work on their defensive slides as they also learn to explode into a move. Balance and footwork are the keys to success both in this drill and in the game of basketball.
    • Ranger Drill: This breakdown drill teaches proper defensive rotations in a baseline drive-and-kick situation. Players learn to get into their correct defensive positions, take charges and hustle to a block out.

    Coach McDermott then works extensively on closeouts. Integrating closeouts into your bigger team defensive concepts is critical as you help your players develop. Two drills are key to his team's success in this area.

    • Three Line Closeouts: Coach McDermott demonstrates the three types of closeouts his players must execute in order to be successful. The Kobe, Korver and Rondo closeouts are all different but each has a place in Creighton's defensive schemes and should be part of yours as well.
    • Berlin Closeouts: In this drill, players must not closeout to their man, but rather to the correct defensive position.

    Team defense is then emphasized in the shell drill. Coach McDermott and his staff discuss each component of the screen defense. Knowing how to deal with down screens, flare screens and stagger screens is essential in helping your team achieve success against screening offenses. Finally Coach McDermott runs some 5-on-5 where we not only get to see the defensive concepts as a whole but also get a peek at some of Creighton's offensive sets and concepts, including multiple set plays that feature a screen-the-screener action.

    On the offensive side of the ball, Coach McDermott shares offensive breakdowns and shooting drills specifically for perimeter and post players. The offensive breakdown stations include:

    • Guards: One More drill / Shots out of the offense / Game speed cuts.
    • Forwards: Flips / Figure 8 shooting / Walling up and boxing out.

    Coach McDermott's practice is a great example of how to run a fast-paced, effective and well-balanced practice. You will be inspired to implement several of these defensive drills because they address so many crucial aspects of the game without creating a lopsided practice. In only 80 minutes, virtually every important aspect is covered - from 5-on-5 strategy to a variety of shell drills to individual workouts and more.

    Produced at the Fall 2014 Omaha (NE) clinic.

    81 minutes. 2015.


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    with Saul Phillips, Ohio University Head Coach; former North Dakota State University Head Coach; 2014 Summitt League Coach of the Year; 2x Summitt League champions

    Every coach's biggest defensive challenges are forcing low percentage shots and keeping players out of foul trouble. Saul Phillips' "pack line" defense has just the right balance of intensity and containment to achieve this goal.

    While many coaches use a variation of this defense, Coach Phillips' presentation focuses less on philosophy and more on practical implementation. Coach Phillips, a former Bo Ryan assistant, takes what he learned from Coach Ryan and other great coaches who used the pack line defense and shows his audience how to implement it through a variety of drills. Regardless of the size of your coaching staff, you will be able to use every drill effectively.

    Coach Phillips opens the presentation by explaining why a team should play the pack line defense. By containing the dribble, preventing penetration and keeping the offense out of the paint, the pack line almost assures that the other team will have to consistently settle for shots. Getting these contested jump shots is one of the biggest keys to playing this defense.

    Coach Phillips shares a few simple, easy-to-implement drills that help players quickly learn their responsibilities within the defense. These include:

    • 1-on-2 drive. This drill focuses on playing great 1-on-1 defense as well as the basis of the pack line's success, which is to help defense on dribble penetration.
    • 2-on-2 closeout. Teaching proper spacing and quick weak side help are the focus of this competitive drill.
    • 3-on-3 Shell. While stopping dribble penetration, proper rotations forces the longest pass possible. At the same time, this drill also focuses on the perimeter players' responsibilities and reactions when the ball is entered into the post.
    • 4-on-4 Shell. In this learning-by-doing drill, Coach Phillips explains proper reactions to a variety of offensive executions, such as America action, floppy action, screen-the-screener action, and pick-and-roll action.

    These drills have enabled Coach Phillip's teams to use the pack line defense to even the playing field when facing more athletic teams.

    If you're thinking about adding the pack line defense to your arsenal, add this DVD to your coaching library today.

    Produced at the Fall 2014 Wisconsin Basketball Coaches Association Clinic.

    51 minutes. 2015.


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    with Don Klaas, former College of DuPage Head Men's Basketball Coach;
    distinguished member of the NJCAA Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Fame;
    Ranks 8th in career wins (813) NJCAA history; 2002 NJCAA Division II National Champions; 2002 National Coach of the Year; 12 North Central Community College Conference Championships

    With the 1-3-1 defense, players will commit fewer fouls, you'll get more players involved in the game, and you'll force opponents to spend time preparing for your defense rather than working on what they do. Each of these factors gives your team an advantage at game time.

    After more than 800 career wins, Illinois coaching legend Don Klaas still has an undying passion for defense, which he demonstrates in this high-energy video. A masterful teacher, he shares the ins and outs of his tough-to-penetrate 1-3-1 zone defense, including multiple variations. Coach Klaas teaches you everything from basic set-up to using a numbering and color system to adjust your defense on the fly - without having to call timeout. When taught the right way, this defense will disrupt and dismantle your opponent's offensive game plan.

    Responsibilities and Rotations
    To begin the clinic, Coach Klaas explains his basketball philosophy and what led him to learn, implement and perfect the 1-3-1 zone. Understanding his background gives a deeper understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of this defense. He breaks down where to place each player based on his or her skills and attributes. He then breaks down the responsibilities of each position and clearly explains their importance. Without ever seeing even one possession run, you'll get a good idea of how the defense should work.

    One of the most important concepts behind the 1-3-1 is keeping the ball out of the middle, which is achieved by rotating players. But, as Coach Klaas demonstrates, players are not left on an island trying to figure out how to stop the ball from getting to the middle. Each player has a responsibility, which Coach Klaas thoroughly explains.

    Adjustments
    As the presentation continues, Coach Klaas shows various adjustments for the 1-3-1. Each offensive adjustment is color-coded so that, once learned, you can easily manipulate your defense without calling a timeout. These adjustments and clear communication enable Coach Klaas' players to quickly change the 1-3-1 to force turnovers, create traps and prevent shots. You'll also learn four additional variations to stop quick passes to the corner, no passes into the paint, trapping the corner and trapping on every pass. Klaas goes into greater detail using competitive 5-on-5 half-court situations.

    Throughout the presentation, Coach Klaas shares valuable coaching knowledge. While the focus of the presentation is the 1-3-1 defense, Coach Klaas' insights are equally valuable.

    If you're looking for a new way to confuse and attack your opponents, this DVD is a must-have for you.

    Produced at the Spring 2012 Las Vegas Clinic.

    77 minutes. 2015.


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    with Kevin McGeehan, Campbell University Head Coach;
    former Associate Head Coach at Richmond

    This exclusive open practice presentation is a great example of a comprehensive, goal-oriented practice. Up-and-coming head coach Kevin McGeehan not only lets you witness a live practice, he also shares keen insights on goals and reasoning for each element of it. From warm-up to conclusion, the emphasis is on fundamentals, attention to detail in execution and team communication. Practice has an air of fulfilling the "bigger picture."

    All areas of the game are addressed, so every drill has a specific role and purpose in building and growing towards the ultimate goal. Shooting drills are breakdowns of the offensive strategy. Hustle and defense drills complement the overall defensive strategy. And to make sense of it all, you are introduced to the program's approach to advanced statistics to improve the overall quality of the team.

    Practice begins with a warm-up. This is a critical part of practice to Coach McGeehan, who believes that it should be maximized by implementing skill work. A brief "individual skill work" session is followed by a team warm-up that's also filled with skill work.

    To practice their intricate "spread motion attack offense," various groups work 5-on-0, emphasizing execution, especially timing, and spacing for each variation. Every drill is competitive as players go against each other 5-on-5 and 3-on-3. The "pirate" drill is a great 5-on-5 drill that's competitive at both ends and forces the team to transition into defense as quickly and effectively as possible. In the next segment, you witness Campbell's match-up zone defense, as they practice against a 1-4 high setup and learn the different defensive rotations and switches.

    The last part of the presentation is dedicated to the coaching staff's use of advanced statistics in practice. You'll learn what the staff tracks, why and how to use it to motivate players' competitive spirit. Analyzing players' practice performance on a daily basis gives coaches and players great insight and deeper understanding of their own strengths and weaknesses.

    Get a lesson from this fast-rising coach on how he uses "add ons" to improve drills that have been taught for decades to take his program to the next level. Use every element of practice, even warm-up, will challenge your players to execute fundamentals to perfection.

    147 minutes. 2015.


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    with Gary Waters, Cleveland State Head Coach;
    winningest coach in Cleveland State history; 2008 Horizon League Coach of the Year; 2011 Horizon League Champions

    Learn how Coach Gary Waters has transformed the Cleveland State basketball program into a perennial winner with this inside look into one of their practices. You'll see how his coaches structure practices to develop the fundamentals needed to play a unique brand of pressure defense and score effectively in their "flow" continuity ball screen offense.

    Watch how Cleveland State prioritizes player development in their practice structure with a heavy emphasis on individual skills in the early warm-up segments. During a daily 15-minute pre-practice session, the team is split between guards/posts with each working on increasing ball-handling skills and finishing around the rim. Guards engage in several ball-handling drills ranging from individual work, partners' mirroring sessions and a creative way to incorporate an agility ladder into dribbling exercises. The post players also work on ball-handling before moving into their own sets of finishing at the rim exercises complete with jump hooks, drop step moves and paint jump shots as well as attacking from the perimeter and high post.

    Integrated into the beginning of practice is a series of dynamic stretches, competitive jump roping and agility ladders to prepare the body for practice while improving the quickness of the athletes. In order to increase foot speed and overall quickness, the team collectively jumps rope in 30-second intervals with the goal of 100-120 repetitions in the 30-second period. The agility ladder is utilized once again in an intense yet creative way that incorporates defensive closeout actions.

    Transition marks the beginning of the next phase of practice as Coach Waters first emphasizes the offensive aspect of transition before shifting his focus to defensive transition. Players work on spotting up in transition for open jump shots with the full-court shooting drill. They then learn how to ignite the fast break with a quick outlet and pass ahead in the rebound and outlet drill. Coach Waters explains the principles and roles of his transition offense and then players demonstrate the different scoring options in their fast break. This practice sequence ends with the 5-on-5 "get back" drill that has the defense trying to recover from a disadvantage situation in the fast break. This is a great drill for developing your transition game on both sides of the ball.

    Coach Waters shares several on-ball defense and close-out drills designed to build proper defensive habits. He walks through the basic rotations of his defense with the 4-on-4 step-up drill. You'll get several variations of this drill that can be used to change the focus of how the team defense rotates to help stop dribble penetration.

    Learn how to implement a structured ball screen attack into your offensive system with the "flow" ball screen continuity offense. Watch Coach Waters' players demonstrate the pattern and options in the offense with a 5-on-0 practice. Learn how to build the offense with four different breakdown drills that will train your players to utilize the ball screen. You'll get a chance to study the offense in action with two different styles of 5-on-5 scrimmage.

    This look into Coach Waters' practice shows you the winning strategies and coaching that have led to the resurgence in Cleveland State basketball.

    Produced at the Fall 2014 Cleveland (OH) clinic.

    142 minutes. 2105.


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    with Kevin McGeehan, Campbell University Head Coach;
    former Associate Head Coach at Richmond

    Take your zone defense to the next level by incorporating the strategies of Kevin McGeehan's true match-up zone. Coach McGeehan has a history of great defensive teams. In this on-court presentation, he teaches how to implement a match-up zone defense that will confuse and frustrate opponents into taking low percentage jump shots. By mixing traditional man-to-man defense principles with the rim protection of a zone, Coach McGeehan takes away the effectiveness of dribble drives and ball screens, the two most-used offensive means of attack.

    The session starts with the basics for each position and how the other positions match up based on how the point guard picks up. Each position has a specific role and duty, starting with not allowing any uncontested shots, containing dribble penetration and blocking face-cuts. You'll see how 1 and 2 guard fronts are matched up as well how they defend the post. Coach McGeehan demonstrates how positioning prevents dribble penetration.

    Using a 5-on-5 shell drill, Coach McGeehan explains the basic rules and reactions. You'll learn how to handle screens, a technique for dealing with cutters, where the help needs be and how to handle the skip pass. One of the goals of a zone offense is to distort the defense. Coach McGeehan shows how his teams keep their shape, which is a key component to the success of his defense.

    Once the basics are covered, you'll learn how to defend a variety of offensive actions and alignments. Coach McGeehan explains, in detail, how the basic rules of team defense work against each of these actions in addition to specific strategies for certain hard to guard plays. Learn how to defend five of the most common offensive movements:

      4-out-1-in (pass-and cut, as well as swing stagger screens and baseline runners)Carolina screens (back-screens, and down-screens)Ball screens (pick-and-roll, pick-and-pop, high ball screens)"V" (Horns)1-4 High

    With Coach McGeehan's instruction, you'll be able to confuse and frustrate your opponents on a nightly basis. Instead of adjusting your defense to their offense, they will be forced to adjust to you. Because of its strong ties to man-to-man defense, you can also use it as a secondary defense, which makes it even harder to dissect. Opponents will be helpless as they try to figure out how to beat this dominant defensive system.

    55 minutes. 2015.


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    with Kevin McGeehan, Campbell University Head Coach;
    former Associate Head Coach at Richmond under former Head Coach Chris Mooney

    Space the floor and take advantage of interchangeable players who can pass, dribble and shoot with the spread motion attack offense. Kevin McGeehan gives you a detailed on-court demonstration of this offense that will give your players the structure they need to space the floor and play as a team to create opportunities for open jump shots and easy layups.

    Developed over time, the spread motion attack is a combination of Pete Carrill's Princeton Offense, NBA-style ball screens and elements of the dribble drive motion offense. Coach McGeehan not only shows you the basic principles and movements, he also explains the options (reads) each player has at any given moment.

    Coach McGeehan starts with a brief overview of the philosophy behind the spread motion attack, as well as how it evolved over time to adjust to new defensive trends as well as various rosters and conference opponents. The information he shares in this portion of the presentation will enable you to adapt and adjust the offensive system to your own program. A big component of this motion offense-and one that will make your team tough to prepare for-is a seamless movement from a 1-2-2 spread setup to a 4-out-1-in setup ("point") and back. Step-by-step, Coach McGeehan explains the basic setups, the importance of spacing, how to exploit backdoor cuts, and teaching timing for specific passes and scenarios.

    He continues with a 1-2-2 spread setup to "point" (4-out-1-in) using various entries and diverse scenarios. Here is where Coach McGeehan (and his system) shines because what usually would take an entire afternoon to explain, he breaks down into easily understood "if/then" scenarios. This action gets the ball into the high post through transition and creates multiple scoring opportunities by screening away. This set can also change the angle of the screen away to different spots on the floor to initiate different offensive options. This basic action allows players to score through backdoor cuts, open jump shots, dribble handoffs, ball screens, drift screens and more. You'll also learn variations to these basic sets that use "color calls" to signal different offensive actions and counter defensive tactics.

    The premise of the spread motion attack offense is putting your players in a position to accurately, effectively and intuitively read the defense to create scoring opportunities. Learn how to transition into the basic sets of the offense and play through a variety of options that are created in the structured offense. With time, your team will not only be the toughest team to prepare for but your players will develop a very high basketball IQ.

    85 minutes. 2015.


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    with Eric Flannery, St. Edward High School (OH) Head Coach;
    2x Ohio Division I State Champions; 3-time Cleveland Plain Dealer Coach of the Year and 2007 Associated Press Ohio Coach of the Year; 2013-14 USA Men's U17 Developmental National Team Assistant Coach (FIBA World Championship gold medal); 2010 USA Youth Olympic Games Team Head Coach

    Beating a zone defense often comes down to deflecting shots from the perimeter. So if your team is struggling with their shot, you need strategies in place to get higher percentage shots. St. Edward High School Head Coach Eric Flannery shares the strategies you need in his highly successful zone offensive package. Coach Flannery takes to the court to explain his coaching philosophy, and the principles to dismantle any zone defense, including an array of set plays and inbound plays to adapt into your program. Easily learned and quickly taught, each play is an effective tool to get a basket for you team.

    Coach Flannery begins the session with insights on practice planning, as well as working with players on the court. He not only has had years of experience teaching on the court, but has also learned from some of the best coaches in the country while working for USA basketball. Coach Flannery offers his take on "mind candy" and how it can be used to reach today's players. He continues by explaining the seven principles common to attacking any zone defense.

    Moving to the court, Coach Flannery breaks down his seven principles for attacking zones. By following these principles, your team will be able to dismantle any zone defense with smart passes, screens and drives. The biggest idea, however, is the concept of "attacking" the zone. Getting the ball inside, attacking the gaps and playing behind the zone are just a few of the concepts Coach Flannery shares.

    Coach Flannery introduces the "ball screen continuity" offensive attack used by the USA Men's Developmental National Team to claim gold this past season at the FIBA World Championships. While many ball screen offenses require multiple passes to get great looks, this system uses spacing the floor to set up quick offensive strikes. This 1-4 high motion is easy to implement, effective against both man and zone defenses and includes four different entry passes to start the offense. To help you teach this to your players, Coach Flannery shares two breakdown drills to improve not only your players' skill sets, but also help them to better understand the play.

    No offensive package is complete without a series of baseline and sideline out-of -bounds plays. Coach Flannery and his two assistants demonstrate four baseline out-of-bounds plays along with two sideline out-of-bounds plays. Each is simple, yet effective, and strives at placing zone defenders in an indecisive state of who to guard, thereby opening either a 3-point attempt or layup on the ball-side block.

    Coach Flannery also shares insights into the game and working with players at all levels.

    If you're looking for effective, proven ways to score against a zone, this presentation is for you. Whether it's from a set offense, set plays or inbound plays, Coach Flannery and his staff give you the tools to have success against the zone defense.

    Produced at the Fall 2014 Cleveland (OH) Clinic.

    79 minutes. 2015.


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    with Ben Jacobson,
    University of Northern Iowa Head Coach; 2015 MVC Tournament Champions;
    2015 MVC Coach of the Year (3x MVC Coach of the Year);
    most wins of any head basketball coach in school history; 2010 Sweet Sixteen

    University of Northern Iowa Head Coach Ben Jacobson shares in-depth skills and drills to build your on- and off-ball defense.

    Coach Jacobson shares the ways he has modified in his unique program of practice organization and drill instruction to get better results in live-game action. Each drill has a few primary coaching points and Coach Jacobson shows goals for each that keeps the team efficiently working to achieve those goals.

    Warm-up
    In the warm-up segment, Coach Jacobson and his staff demonstrate several drills for improving footwork, balance and closing out. Two key fundamentals are emphasized here; closing out to contest the shot and keeping hands wide to defend the dribble. Players learn balance, proper footwork and closing out on the ball.

    The drills gradually progress to longer closeouts that stretch the defender's range. These drills require players to be quick and take short steps as they closeout to remain in contact with the floor. In the 3-on-3, 4-on-4 and 5-on-5 drills, Coach Jacobson emphasizes being light on the feet, ready to move and getting the head on a swivel to avoid getting caught staring at the basketball.

    Transition
    Games are won and lost in transition. Teams must be able to score when they have the advantage on offense and get stops when they are at a disadvantage on defense. Coach Jacobson shares a transition drill that works on advantages on offense and disadvantages on the defensive end.

    Half Court Defense
    Teams need to get stops in the half-court defensively and have the ability to execute and convert offensively when opposing defenses are set. Coach Jacobson ends his presentation with two half-court drills - the "Butler Drill" and the "Shutout Drill.' The Butler Drill starts as a disadvantage 4-on-3 drill to work communication, covering for each other and rotation. The emphasis is guarding the basketball one-on-one to reduce the number of required defensive rotations.

    The Shutout Drill is a 5-on-5 drill that trains the defense to make stops until the 35-second shot clock runs out. If the offense scores, is fouled or gets an offensive rebound, the 35-second shot clock is reset. Teaching defensive intensity is important because many times the defense has to stop the offense three times in order for the clock to tick to zero.

    Raise the level of your team defense this season. Coach Jacobson shows you how to organize practices in order to transition proven fundamentals into positive live game improvements. This will help you get the most out of your valuable practice time.

    Produced at the 2014 IBCA Clinic.

    72 minutes. 2015.


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    with Sue Phillips,
    Archbishop Mitty (CA) High School Head Girls Coach;
    10x NorCal Regional Champion, 5x California Interscholastic Federation state championships;
    USA Women's U17 National Team Head Coach; led Team USA to gold medals at the 2014 USA Women's U17 World Championships and the 2013 FIBA Americas U16 Championships; named USA Basketball Co-Developmental Coach of the Year in 2013 and 2014.

    Coach Sue Phillips takes to the floor in this live demonstration to share effective plays you can use out of a 1-4 box set. These are the same plays that Coach Phillips used to win a gold medal with the U17 Women's National Team at the 2014 FIBA World Championship in Spain.

    She breaks down all of the intricate parts that make the 1-4 offensive box sets so special, giving you the keys to offensive success.

    Keys to Offensive Success
    Coach Phillips begins by explaining the keys to offensive success such as floor balance, spacing, creating high-low situations and easy reversals. Executing these keys will improve your shooting percentage and put your team in optimal position to grab offensive rebounds and play transition defense. This model easily translates to quick hitters.

    Quick Hitters
    Coach Phillips breaks down quick hitters out of the 1-4 box set. You'll see everything from spacing to using the painter's dot for precise positioning. Each play creates a high-low situation and options for the inside and outside game. The basic sets feature the following alignments and formations:

    • UCLA/High-Low action
    • Flash to Elbow Backdoor with Flare Screens
    • Stagger-Curl Screens
    • Baseline Entry to corner
    • Flex Action

    These quick hitters give you greater control of who's taking shots and they can play to your strengths and hide weaknesses. No matter what the defense throws at you, there's a play with multiple counters here. You'll be able to exploit backdoor cuts, lobs, ball screens, and so on to score the long ball or layups. There are many different options - add the ones you like immediately and add the rest over time.

    Zone Offense and Out of Bounds Plays
    Coach Phillips breaks down her zone offense sets. Both of these zone sets (Circle and Square) create high-low opportunities with built-in screening options for creating looks both inside and out. Phillips addresses how to prepare for and attack a zone or match-up zone defense.

    Out-of-bounds plays are demonstrated versus man and zone defense from a 1-4 low set.

    The 1-4 Box Set Offense presentation is packed with plays and options to dismantle any defense.

    Produced at the Fall 2014. Phoenix (AZ) clinic.

    71 minutes. 2015.


    0 0

    with Sue Phillips,
    Archbishop Mitty (CA) High School Head Girls Coach;
    10x NorCal Regional Champion, 5x California Interscholastic Federation state championships;
    USA Women's U17 National Team Head Coach; led Team USA to gold medals at the 2014 USA Women's U17 World Championships and the 2013 FIBA Americas U16 Championships; named USA Basketball Co-Developmental Coach of the Year in 2013 and 2014.

    Over the last two decades at Archbishop Mitty High School, Sue Phillips has had incredible success with her multiple defensive system, winning five state championships.

    In this on-court presentation, she demonstrates 10+ drills you can use to teach the concepts of her "black" and "white" man-to-man defenses.

      Black - An aggressive, denial-style defense.White - Players back into the gaps to support the ball defender.

    Individual Defense
    Coach Phillips explains how she teaches basic defensive movements, on-ball defense, helping on penetration, rebounding, denying passes and defending the on-ball screen.

    Any style of defense will struggle or excel based on whether players can properly execute these universal defensive techniques.

    Coach Phillips shares five warm-up drills that develop the defensive mechanics players use when sliding, boxing out, and closing out. These drills include:

    • Push-pull - fine-tunes proper slides and develops explosiveness
    • Push-back - a box out drill
    • Recover Runs - teaches players how to cover the entire court
    • Full Court 1-on-1 - a competitive drill to "turn and stop" the ball handler
    • Closeout Drill - a competitive drill to cement fundamentals

    Team Defense
    Discover a progression of team drills starting with a 2-on-1 match up and building up to 5-on-4.

    Any defense will occasionally have breakdowns and your players need to practice these situations in order to know how to successfully handle them.

    In the "Dribble-Drop Triangle Shell" drill, players learn how to rotate to help on penetration from the weak side. Coach Phillips only allows players to stunt and recover on the strong side. Help in this defensive system must come from the post stepping up to stop the ball. This rotation requires team coordination, as another defender must drop to help cover the post.

    The 3-on-3 Penetration Progression expands this concept to dribble penetration from the sides and works on negating middle penetration, closing out, helping outside the paint and recovering with crossing defensively.

    Coach Phillips also shares two drills that she uses to teach players how to deny the passing lanes. Players practice denying on the perimeter and shutting down cutters in the 4-on-3 Circle Chug drill. This drill improves physicality, not allowing face cuts, defensive court awareness and team defense principles. In the 4-on-3 Two Post Shell drill, players learn how to deny the post and quickly switch from help defense to on-ball or post defense as the ball moves in the drill.

    Lastly, you see two different ways to defend ball screens in the 4-on-4 shell drill. Black will have players trapping the ball and looking for the interception. White is a vertical hedge at the screen to deter the attack of the dribbler. Coach Phillips also shows a variation of the drill she uses to develop her transition defense in full-court play.

    Coach Phillips' on-court presentation covers all elements from philosophy to individual skill to team strategy. With this knowledge you can build a defensive system that will frustrate any opponent..

    Produced at the Spring 2014 Pittsburgh (PA) clinic.

    57 minutes. 2015.


    0 0

    with Tom Blackford,
    Fayetteville Manlius (NY) High School Head Boys Basketball Coach;
    distinguished member of the New York State Basketball Hall of Fame;
    over 400 victories, 2x New York State High School Champions

    Legendary high school basketball coach Tom Blackford opens his practice session to demonstrate his dominating 1-3-1 half-court defense. With over 30 years of experience and more than 400 career victories at two separate schools (Hamilton High School and Fayetteville Manlius High School), Coach Blackford has built programs that successfully contend for the New York state title year after year. In this exciting presentation, he shares his secrets to developing a smothering 1-3-1 defense.

    In detailed manner, Coach Blackford teaches the responsibilities and actions of the chaser, wings, center and point guard. His primary emphasis here is letting players play without over-thinking their actions. He allows his players to trap and move freely within the parameters of simple rules.

    When teaching this aggressive 1-3-1, Coach Blackford starts with two offensive players bringing the ball up against all five defenders. This technique develops the chaser's skills.

    Next, the defense faces three offensive players with a focus on trapping and getting the ball out of the middle.

    In the next phase, five offensive players set up in a 2-1-2 formation, the most common approach to attacking a 1-3-1 defense. Here the defense works on getting in the passing lanes, stopping dribble penetration, box out responsibilities, defending the high post, low post and dealing with the short corner.

    To make the defense even more effective, Coach Blackford shows how the 1-3-1 can transform into a "Triangle & Two," "Box-in-One" or "Match-Up" defense in the middle of an offensive possession.

    As a bonus, Coach Blackford spends 20 minutes on the offensive side of the ball demonstrating two shooting drills and three offensive plays. These plays include:

    • Secondary - an offensive set that can quickly be run out of transition
    • Syracuse - a play that uses multiple double screens
    • Michigan State Interchange - a 4-out 1-in play with the post player giving back screen and ball screen action

    Coach Blackford also shares some of the proven strategies he's used over the years to build successful programs.

    This season, adjust and disguise your aggressive 1-3-1 defense on the fly using these proven strategies and techniques.

    96 minutes. 2015.


    0 0

    BD-04806A: with Bob Hoffman,
    Mercer University Head Coach, over 450 career wins;
    back-to-back Atlantic Sun Conference Coach of the Year (2013-14);
    2014 Atlantic Sun Conference regular season and tournament champions;
    coached the first NCAA tournament victory in program history (2014 over Duke);
    2012 CollegeInsider.com Tournament Championship

    Take your ball screen offense to the next level! Mercer Head Coach Bob Hoffman focuses on offense and the various plays you can implement to make your offense more adaptable and less predictable. In 2014, Coach Hoffman led the Bears to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 1985.

    Using chalk talk and live practice footage, Coach Hoffman shares the ins and outs of his system from transition offense to quick hitters to zone offense and more. A key element of Coach Hoffman's offensive philosophy is to keep plays simple yet adaptable in setup and execution to keep opponents guessing.

    Before hitting the court, Coach Hoffman explains the offensive philosophy behind his mode of attack. He believes a fast tempo secondary transition is a crucial element. Using the whiteboard, he covers some of the different quick hitters he uses in his version of the Carolina Break. These actions are utilized based on defensive reads and can easily flow into the main offense if a scoring opportunity does not immediately present itself.

    Coach Hoffman shares two examples of box set plays used by his teams to score off of delayed ball screens. Both of these plays make use of some early screening action to transform into any Horns set you'd like to run.

    Believing that dead ball situations should be viewed as opportunities to score instead of just getting the ball in, Coach Hoffman shows you two baseline inbounds plays to attack man or zone defenses.

    Once the Mercer basketball team hits the court for practice, you'll see more plays from their ball screen offense. In both 5-on-0 half-court and full-court practice segments, players work through scoring options in their transition offense and also run through several series of plays in their early offense.

    With the Double, both posts set up a double ball screen in transition that the point guard can use or reject to initiate different options. Use this play to confuse the defense over who has help responsibilities on the ball handler or the roll player. Chin offers set plays that use a down screen to free up a post to run into a high-ball screen without a defender in position to help. You'll also learn how to flow into early ball screens in your transition offense along with a couple variations to the play that will help you tweak this basic action.

    This practice also gives you a chance to look at other aspects of the Mercer offensive system. You'll see a review of four baseline inbounds plays that make use of stagger screens and screen-the-screener actions.

    Coach Hoffman practices his zone offense against a 1-2-2 zone defense with the "Muscle" and "Muscle Runner" set plays. Both of these plays overload the defense and create post-up opportunities against the zone with a high ball screen and quick reversal to a corner shooter.

    You'll also learn how to confidently advance the ball against full-court defenses with a simple press offense.

    This presentation is a culmination of over 25 years of coaching offense. Coach Hoffman has created a diverse and adaptable offensive strategy that is easily learned and used by his players. These strategies will keep you in the driver's seat while your opponents are left guessing.

    86 minutes. 2015.



    BD-04806B: with Bob Hoffman,
    Mercer University Head Coach, over 450 career wins;
    back-to-back Atlantic Sun Conference Coach of the Year (2013-14);
    2014 Atlantic Sun Conference regular season and tournament champions;
    coached the first NCAA tournament victory in program history (2014 over Duke);
    2012 CollegeInsider.com Tournament Championship

    Offense wins games, but defense wins championships. Put your team in championship mode with these defensive strategies and skills from Mercer Head Coach Bob Hoffman. In 2014, Coach Hoffman led Mercer to the NCAA tournament for the first time in school history. In addition, the 14 seed Bears knocked off a 3 seed to advance to the third round.

    In this presentation, Coach Hoffman emphasizes and builds on the fundamentals of closeouts, footwork and communication in every drill - in a live practice setting. His overall defensive philosophy can be summarized in one word: flexibility. Throughout a season, he teaches many different defensive principles to counter the most common offensive approaches. You'll see how he balances the importance of defensive fundamentals while teaching different shell drill variations, as well as different ways to defend on-ball screens.

    Coach Hoffman begins his practice with small-group defensive stations. His assistant coaches take charge of teaching as the team hustles through a series of drills focused on improving defensive tactics. The Single/Double drill will help your players learn to coordinate the way they handle single or double off-ball screens. The Closeout/Contain/Chest Up drill helps players improve their on-ball defense by recovering to the ball and stopping the offense from scoring. The Show drill focuses on hedges when defending a side ball screen.

    In this segment, you will pick up numerous strategies for handling on-ball and off-ball screens. Nearly every coach uses a variation of shell drill to practice team defense. Using several progressive layers of the shell drill, Coach Hoffman teaches players how to work together to defend basket cuts, staggered weak side screens, staggered screens and baseline drives.

    The Box Screening drill is a great tool to work on both setting and defending screens. In a small area, 4-on-4 setting, offensive players work on timing and spacing while the defense fights through and/or around down screens and back screens.

    In a 5-on-5 scrimmage segment that ends the practice session, you'll see how to mix up your strategies for defending on-ball screens with switches, jamming the roller, showing and more.

    This segment from the Mercer Open Practice series will inspire you to examine your defensive approach. Coach Hoffman is a great communicator and his emphasis on fundamental defensive skills and communication will resonate with any coach.

    65 minutes. 2015.



    BD-04806C: with Bob Hoffman,
    Mercer University Head Coach, over 450 career wins;
    back-to-back Atlantic Sun Conference Coach of the Year (2013-14);
    2014 Atlantic Sun Conference regular season and tournament champions;
    coached the first NCAA tournament victory in program history (2014 over Duke);
    2012 CollegeInsider.com Tournament Championship

    This Open Practice look at skill development will show you how to build players who can take care of the ball and finish at the rim. Coach Bob Hoffman demonstrates drills to enhance footwork, passing and ball handling, cutting and screening, and position specific skills; all shown in a live practice format.

    Ball Handling
    For ball handling, players work on improving their ability to use both hands to dribble and pass. This segment includes individual and partner drills. In groups of two, players work on their footwork for both offense and defense. A major defensive topic in Coach Hoffman's philosophy is proper closeout technique. In this partner setting, one person works on closing out under control while the other person works on straight drives, crossover drives, jab steps, lifts and front pivoting.

    Triple Threat
    A good offensive player must have a solid, diverse arsenal of moves out of the triple threat position. Here players work to improve, solidify and automate jump stops, jab steps, rips, shot fakes and the first step. Eliminating wasted motion makes your players harder to guard as they explode out of their triple threat to attack the rim.

    Passing
    You'll see how players work on a variety of different passes through their Partner Passing drill. In groups of two and each player with a ball, the team works on a variety of entry passes with either hand, as well as overhead skip passes. Being able to deploy the pass from different angles enables your players to deliver the ball whenever it's needed versus a tough defender.

    Position Play
    While each player should have an all-encompassing skill set, a heightened position-specific skill set is a must. Guards and forwards are separated for this segment. Guards work on the perimeter to improve cutting, filling and fanning. Spacing and timing are big topics here, too. At the other end, forwards work on sealing the defender in the post, dives and duck-ins, Mikans and power moves.

    Finishing
    Coach Hoffman also emphasizes finishing lay-ups with three different drills that work on attacking the rim in half-court and full-court situations. Train your players to make strong drives into the paint and use different finishes at the basket with the Live Ball Lay-Ups drill. In the Full Court Lay-Up drill, players simulate bursting out at full-speed for a fast break lay-up. The 2-on-0 Lay-Ups Off the Glass drill teaches players to complete quick outlets and sprint lanes in transition to score.

    Regardless of skill level, teaching the basics is an open-ended challenge. Footwork and ambidexterity with the ball are essential components of success. This presentation offers plenty of short drills you can easily implement in your practice or use as an hour-long workout.

    44 minutes. 2015.



    BD-04806D: with Bob Hoffman,
    Mercer University Head Coach, over 450 career wins;
    back-to-back Atlantic Sun Conference Coach of the Year (2013-14);
    2014 Atlantic Sun Conference regular season and tournament champions;
    coached the first NCAA tournament victory in program history (2014 over Duke);
    2012 CollegeInsider.com Tournament Championship

    In a live practice setting, Coach Bob Hoffman presents a great collection of intense and effective practice drills and coaching techniques for creating a culture of teamwork and communication. This constant emphasis on building players into a cohesive unit has enabled a small-conference underdog like Mercer to take down powerhouse basketball programs in the NCAA tournament.

    Transition Offense
    Learn how to develop your transition offense using five full-court drills that emphasize different aspects of the fast break.

    • The Three Lines, Two Balls drill works on finishing lay-ups and igniting the offense with a quick outlet.
    • The Pacer drill challenges players to make jump shots in transition.
    • Watch as Coach Hoffman progressively increases the challenge of his Three Man Weave drill by shrinking the time goals and passes allowed on trips up and down the court.
    • Work on scoring in advantage situations in transition with the Five Man Weave to 3-on-2 Back drill.

    Defense is emphasized as well with the "Line Transition" drill. This drill pressures the defense to protect the rim in a temporary disadvantage situation.

    Early Offense
    You'll also get new ideas on how to develop your own early offense using break down drills. Using a series of 3-man and 4-man full-court drills, Coach Hoffman's team practices the scoring actions they'll look for in their transition attack such as open jump shots for their guards and different ways to feed the post for the big who sprinted the floor.

    Scrimmages
    Finally, see how the coaches control their scrimmages to teach players the details of their offensive and defensive system. Each stop in the action includes a brief huddle where new strategies and cleanup from the previous play can be discussed.

    This presentation can be used as a template for a full practice and can also be dissected drill by drill for your own purposes. This open practice gives drills and skills for building the teamwork needed to have an effective up-tempo offensive attack.

    53 minutes. 2015.




    0 0

    with Bob Hoffman,
    Mercer University Head Coach, over 450 career wins;
    back-to-back Atlantic Sun Conference Coach of the Year (2013-14);
    2014 Atlantic Sun Conference regular season and tournament champions;
    coached the first NCAA tournament victory in program history (2014 over Duke);
    2012 CollegeInsider.com Tournament Championship

    In a live practice setting, Coach Bob Hoffman presents a great collection of intense and effective practice drills and coaching techniques for creating a culture of teamwork and communication. This constant emphasis on building players into a cohesive unit has enabled a small-conference underdog like Mercer to take down powerhouse basketball programs in the NCAA tournament.

    Transition Offense
    Learn how to develop your transition offense using five full-court drills that emphasize different aspects of the fast break.

    • The Three Lines, Two Balls drill works on finishing lay-ups and igniting the offense with a quick outlet.
    • The Pacer drill challenges players to make jump shots in transition.
    • Watch as Coach Hoffman progressively increases the challenge of his Three Man Weave drill by shrinking the time goals and passes allowed on trips up and down the court.
    • Work on scoring in advantage situations in transition with the Five Man Weave to 3-on-2 Back drill.

    Defense is emphasized as well with the "Line Transition" drill. This drill pressures the defense to protect the rim in a temporary disadvantage situation.

    Early Offense
    You'll also get new ideas on how to develop your own early offense using break down drills. Using a series of 3-man and 4-man full-court drills, Coach Hoffman's team practices the scoring actions they'll look for in their transition attack such as open jump shots for their guards and different ways to feed the post for the big who sprinted the floor.

    Scrimmages
    Finally, see how the coaches control their scrimmages to teach players the details of their offensive and defensive system. Each stop in the action includes a brief huddle where new strategies and cleanup from the previous play can be discussed.

    This presentation can be used as a template for a full practice and can also be dissected drill by drill for your own purposes. This open practice gives drills and skills for building the teamwork needed to have an effective up-tempo offensive attack.

    53 minutes. 2015.


    0 0

    with Bob Hoffman,
    Mercer University Head Coach, over 450 career wins;
    back-to-back Atlantic Sun Conference Coach of the Year (2013-14);
    2014 Atlantic Sun Conference regular season and tournament champions;
    coached the first NCAA tournament victory in program history (2014 over Duke);
    2012 CollegeInsider.com Tournament Championship

    Take your ball screen offense to the next level! Mercer Head Coach Bob Hoffman focuses on offense and the various plays you can implement to make your offense more adaptable and less predictable. In 2014, Coach Hoffman led the Bears to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 1985.

    Using chalk talk and live practice footage, Coach Hoffman shares the ins and outs of his system from transition offense to quick hitters to zone offense and more. A key element of Coach Hoffman's offensive philosophy is to keep plays simple yet adaptable in setup and execution to keep opponents guessing.

    Before hitting the court, Coach Hoffman explains the offensive philosophy behind his mode of attack. He believes a fast tempo secondary transition is a crucial element. Using the whiteboard, he covers some of the different quick hitters he uses in his version of the Carolina Break. These actions are utilized based on defensive reads and can easily flow into the main offense if a scoring opportunity does not immediately present itself.

    Coach Hoffman shares two examples of box set plays used by his teams to score off of delayed ball screens. Both of these plays make use of some early screening action to transform into any Horns set you'd like to run.

    Believing that dead ball situations should be viewed as opportunities to score instead of just getting the ball in, Coach Hoffman shows you two baseline inbounds plays to attack man or zone defenses.

    Once the Mercer basketball team hits the court for practice, you'll see more plays from their ball screen offense. In both 5-on-0 half-court and full-court practice segments, players work through scoring options in their transition offense and also run through several series of plays in their early offense.

    With the Double, both posts set up a double ball screen in transition that the point guard can use or reject to initiate different options. Use this play to confuse the defense over who has help responsibilities on the ball handler or the roll player. Chin offers set plays that use a down screen to free up a post to run into a high-ball screen without a defender in position to help. You'll also learn how to flow into early ball screens in your transition offense along with a couple variations to the play that will help you tweak this basic action.

    This practice also gives you a chance to look at other aspects of the Mercer offensive system. You'll see a review of four baseline inbounds plays that make use of stagger screens and screen-the-screener actions.

    Coach Hoffman practices his zone offense against a 1-2-2 zone defense with the "Muscle" and "Muscle Runner" set plays. Both of these plays overload the defense and create post-up opportunities against the zone with a high ball screen and quick reversal to a corner shooter.

    You'll also learn how to confidently advance the ball against full-court defenses with a simple press offense.

    This presentation is a culmination of over 25 years of coaching offense. Coach Hoffman has created a diverse and adaptable offensive strategy that is easily learned and used by his players. These strategies will keep you in the driver's seat while your opponents are left guessing.

    86 minutes. 2015.


    0 0

    with Bob Hoffman,
    Mercer University Head Coach, over 450 career wins;
    back-to-back Atlantic Sun Conference Coach of the Year (2013-14);
    2014 Atlantic Sun Conference regular season and tournament champions;
    coached the first NCAA tournament victory in program history (2014 over Duke);
    2012 CollegeInsider.com Tournament Championship

    Offense wins games, but defense wins championships. Put your team in championship mode with these defensive strategies and skills from Mercer Head Coach Bob Hoffman. In 2014, Coach Hoffman led Mercer to the NCAA tournament for the first time in school history. In addition, the 14 seed Bears knocked off a 3 seed to advance to the third round.

    In this presentation, Coach Hoffman emphasizes and builds on the fundamentals of closeouts, footwork and communication in every drill - in a live practice setting. His overall defensive philosophy can be summarized in one word: flexibility. Throughout a season, he teaches many different defensive principles to counter the most common offensive approaches. You'll see how he balances the importance of defensive fundamentals while teaching different shell drill variations, as well as different ways to defend on-ball screens.

    Coach Hoffman begins his practice with small-group defensive stations. His assistant coaches take charge of teaching as the team hustles through a series of drills focused on improving defensive tactics. The Single/Double drill will help your players learn to coordinate the way they handle single or double off-ball screens. The Closeout/Contain/Chest Up drill helps players improve their on-ball defense by recovering to the ball and stopping the offense from scoring. The Show drill focuses on hedges when defending a side ball screen.

    In this segment, you will pick up numerous strategies for handling on-ball and off-ball screens. Nearly every coach uses a variation of shell drill to practice team defense. Using several progressive layers of the shell drill, Coach Hoffman teaches players how to work together to defend basket cuts, staggered weak side screens, staggered screens and baseline drives.

    The Box Screening drill is a great tool to work on both setting and defending screens. In a small area, 4-on-4 setting, offensive players work on timing and spacing while the defense fights through and/or around down screens and back screens.

    In a 5-on-5 scrimmage segment that ends the practice session, you'll see how to mix up your strategies for defending on-ball screens with switches, jamming the roller, showing and more.

    This segment from the Mercer Open Practice series will inspire you to examine your defensive approach. Coach Hoffman is a great communicator and his emphasis on fundamental defensive skills and communication will resonate with any coach.

    65 minutes. 2015.


    0 0

    with Bob Hoffman,
    Mercer University Head Coach, over 450 career wins;
    back-to-back Atlantic Sun Conference Coach of the Year (2013-14);
    2014 Atlantic Sun Conference regular season and tournament champions;
    coached the first NCAA tournament victory in program history (2014 over Duke);
    2012 CollegeInsider.com Tournament Championship

    This Open Practice look at skill development will show you how to build players who can take care of the ball and finish at the rim. Coach Bob Hoffman demonstrates drills to enhance footwork, passing and ball handling, cutting and screening, and position specific skills; all shown in a live practice format.

    Ball Handling
    For ball handling, players work on improving their ability to use both hands to dribble and pass. This segment includes individual and partner drills. In groups of two, players work on their footwork for both offense and defense. A major defensive topic in Coach Hoffman's philosophy is proper closeout technique. In this partner setting, one person works on closing out under control while the other person works on straight drives, crossover drives, jab steps, lifts and front pivoting.

    Triple Threat
    A good offensive player must have a solid, diverse arsenal of moves out of the triple threat position. Here players work to improve, solidify and automate jump stops, jab steps, rips, shot fakes and the first step. Eliminating wasted motion makes your players harder to guard as they explode out of their triple threat to attack the rim.

    Passing
    You'll see how players work on a variety of different passes through their Partner Passing drill. In groups of two and each player with a ball, the team works on a variety of entry passes with either hand, as well as overhead skip passes. Being able to deploy the pass from different angles enables your players to deliver the ball whenever it's needed versus a tough defender.

    Position Play
    While each player should have an all-encompassing skill set, a heightened position-specific skill set is a must. Guards and forwards are separated for this segment. Guards work on the perimeter to improve cutting, filling and fanning. Spacing and timing are big topics here, too. At the other end, forwards work on sealing the defender in the post, dives and duck-ins, Mikans and power moves.

    Finishing
    Coach Hoffman also emphasizes finishing lay-ups with three different drills that work on attacking the rim in half-court and full-court situations. Train your players to make strong drives into the paint and use different finishes at the basket with the Live Ball Lay-Ups drill. In the Full Court Lay-Up drill, players simulate bursting out at full-speed for a fast break lay-up. The 2-on-0 Lay-Ups Off the Glass drill teaches players to complete quick outlets and sprint lanes in transition to score.

    Regardless of skill level, teaching the basics is an open-ended challenge. Footwork and ambidexterity with the ball are essential components of success. This presentation offers plenty of short drills you can easily implement in your practice or use as an hour-long workout.

    44 minutes. 2015.


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